PEP

- PEP stands for “Post-Exposure Prophylaxis” which means that PEP is used within 72 hours after a potential exposure to HIV to prevent seroconversion--development of detectable HIV antibodies. It is a course of powerful anti-HIV medications that might be the course of action in instances where condoms break during sex, there was no condom used during sex, you share a needle or syringe with someone else, or you experience sexual assault. (
https://callen-lorde.org/pep/)

- It is a 28-day regimen consisting of at least two different classes of HIV meds and anywhere from 3 to 4 different pills, once or twice a day. It is of the utmost importance to never miss a dose. If you do, take a dose as soon as you remember, but don’t double-up--these drugs can be very hard on your body in order to fight off new HIV infections. Since PEP drugs can be difficult on the immune system -- you will need to take special care to stay as healthy as possible to fight off infection. However, if you’re feeling up to it you can still have sex! Just avoid additional exposure to HIV while taking PEP. Other side effects vary from person to person and may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, and fatigue.
https://checkhimout.ca/pep/how-does-pep-work/
-
If possible, eliminate or reduce fun drug use while on PEP because they can damage your immune system and impact the treatment’s effectiveness.  Find out more about how fun drugs can impact your treatments here. To access PEP, call our clinic to be seen as soon as possible. Remember: the 72-hour exposure window is critical.